Ambassador – Troy Simmonds

Troy studied Film Making and Law at University before enlisting in the Australian Army as an Infantry Soldier. He served 22 years in the Australian Army, including 16 years (1996 – 2012) as an Operator in the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR).

Troy was Patrol Commander of the lead patrol in the 2008 Battle of Khas Uruzgan, which resulted in the awarding of the first Victoria Cross in 40 years to Mark Donaldson VC. At the time this was the fiercest and bloodiest battle for Australian troops since Vietnam. During the intense gun battle that raged for over 2 hours, Troy received two gunshot wounds and still has a bullet lodged in his body today.

Troy’s operational deployments have included Somalia, East Timor, Iraq and six tours of duty in Afghanistan. He was also a member of the SAS Counter Terrorism team for the Sydney Olympics in 2000. His service within SAS included Air (free-fall) Troop, Mobility (Vehicle mounted) Troop, Sniper Team Leader, Patrol Commander, Training Wing Troop Sergeant and Operations Sergeant.

Troy was Troop Sergeant of the SAS Training Wing and helped coordinate the gruelling three week selection course and 18 month SAS reinforcement training process. Troy features as an instructor in the 2010 documentary, “SAS: The Search for Warriors”. In addition to extensive experience as an SAS patrol commander in combat, Troy was intimately involved in SAS mission planning and strategy.

Troy is now retired from the SAS and works as a Safety Manager in the WA Marine industry and has a keen interest in the post service life of all members of the Australian Defence Force. Troy recognises that post service homelessness is a real and ongoing issue that requires a succinct approach within the framework of a well organised and motivated entity.

Troy is also an inspirational speaker and can be contacted at http://www.troysimmondsconsulting.com.au/

Here are some images of Troy during his time with the Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SASR)

Troy conducted an interview with the Australian War Memorial that now forms part of the audio visual display of the Afghanistan exhibit.